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Minor in Media Studies

The minor in Media Studies allows students to choose from among a wide array course offerings from which they can focus on particular media issues-commerce and creativity, art and industry, popular culture, and political power. It also brings together interested professors from across the campus whose own research addresses a range of topics in media arts and studies. Importantly, the new minor addresses all framing principles of Emory's Strategic Plan, as updated in September 2009. Click here for more information about the minor in Media Studies.

Students who minor in Media Studies must take FILM/ARTVIS/IDS 204, Introduction to Media Studies.

The remainder of the minor allows students to pursue one of two tracks: either Media Arts and Cultures (Concentration #1) or Sociocultural Approaches to Media (Concentration #2).

Concentration #1:

Media Arts and Cultures : Requirements, 7 courses total. *

Note: One course in Area II is a prerequisite for courses in Areas III-V and VII.

  1. Foundation Course
    • FILM/ARTVIS/IDS 204: Introduction to Media Studies Fall only
  2. One course in methods of visual analysis/media literacy
    • FILM 270: Introduction to Film (or FILM 190: Freshman Seminar, when taught as Introduction to Film)
    • FILM 371: History of Film to 1954
    • FILM 372: History of Film since 1954
    • FILM 401WR: Film Criticism
    • IDS 216: Visual Culture
    • JRNL 260: News Literacy in a Digital Age
  3. Two courses in Genres
    • FILM 373: Special Topics in Film
    • FILM 389: Special Topics in Media
    • FILM 392: Film Genres
    • FILM 393: Documentary Film
    • FILM 404: Women in Film and Media
    • FILM 405: Experimental/Avant Garde Cinema
    • IDS 385: Imaging Bodies, Screening Lives
  4. One course in Media, History and National Culture/Identity
    • AMST 321: American Routes
    • ASA 363 WR: Literary and Visual Culture in Japan
    • CHN 271WR: Modern China in Films and Fiction
    • CHN 360 WR/ASIA 360 WR/ WS360 WR: Chinese Women in Film and Fiction
    • CHN 394: Screening China
    • FILM 356: History of American Television
    • FILM 395: National Cinemas: Western
    • FILM 396: National Cinemas: Non-Western
    • GER 340: German Film
    • JPN 378WR/ASIA 378WR: Postwar Japan Through its Media
    • JPN 375/FILM 396: National Cinemas: Japanese Film
    • RUSS 373: Russian Art and Literature: Russian Avant-Garde
  5. One course from Sociocultural Approaches to Media
    • AFS 389: African Studies, Media, Islam, Social Movement
    • ANT 341: Communication, Technology & Culture (also LING 341)
    • ANT 342: Media and Culture
    • ANT 343: African Popular Culture (also IDS/AMST 370)
    • ANT 385: Visual Anthropology
    • AMST 385 (009) Social Movements and Media
    • GHCS 300R: Core Issues in Global Health: Global Health in the Media
    • PHIL 351: Media Ethics
    • POLS 379: Politics in Music
    • POLS 490: Political Communication
    • REL 369: Religion and Film
    • REL 370: Spec Tops: Rel & Culture: Islam, Media & Pop Culture (Cross listed with FILM 389)
    • SOC 190: Freshman Seminar: Advertising
    • SOC 325: Sociology of Film
    • SOC 343: Mass Media and Social Influences
    • SOC 327: Language and Symbols of Media
    • SOC 443S: Sociology of Music
  6. One course in media-making
    • ARTVIS 106: Photography I
    • ARTVIS 107/FILM 107: Film, Video and Photography I
    • ARTVIS 206R: Photography II
    • ARTVIS 306: Photography III
    • ARTVIS 385/FILM 385: Documentary Filmmaking
    • JRNL 301: Adv News Reporting and Writing
    • JRNL 311: Electronic Media
    • JRNL 340 WR: Arts Writing and Criticism (also THEA 340 WR; DANC 340 WR)
    • JRNL 450: News Video
    • POLS 386/FILM 389: Guerrilla Political Videography

Concentration #2

Sociocultural Approaches to Media : Requirements, 7 courses total. *

  1. Foundations course
    • FILM/ARTVIS/IDS 204: Introduction to Media Studies
  2. One course in Methods of Visual Analysis/Media Literacy (one of the following):
    • FILM 270: Introduction to Film (or FILM 190: Freshman Seminar, when taught as Introduction to Film)
    • FILM 371: History of Film to 1954
    • FILM 372: History of Film since 1954
    • IDS 216: Visual Culture
    • JRNL 260: News Literacy in a Digital Age
  3. Three courses from Social Science departments (3 of the following):
    • AFS 389: African Studies, Media, Islam, Social Movement
    • ANT 341: Communication, Technology & Culture (also LING 341)
    • ANT 342: Media and Culture
    • ANT 343: African Popular Culture (also IDS?AMST 370)
    • AMST 385 (009): Social Movements and Media
    • GHCS 300R: Core Issues in Global Health: Global Health in the Media
    • PHIL 351: Media Ethics
    • POLS 379: Politics in Music
    • POLS 490: Political Communication
    • REL 369: Religion and Film
    • REL 370: Spec Tops: Rel & Culture: Islam, Media & Pop Culture (Cross listed with FILM 389)
    • SOC 190: Freshman Seminar: Advertising
    • SOC 325: Sociology of Film
    • SOC 327: Language and Symbols of Mass Media (also LING 327)
    • SOC 343: Mass Media and Social Influences
    • SOC 443S: Sociology of Music
  4. One course from a Humanities or Interdisciplinary department (1 of the following):
    • ARTVIS 107/FILM 107: Film, Video and Photography I
    • ASA 363WR: Literary and Visual Culture in Japan
    • CHN 271WR: Modern China in Films and Fiction
    • CHN 360WR/ASIA 360WR/WS 360WR: Chinese Women in Film and Fiction
    • CHN 394/FILM394:Screening China
    • FILM 356: History of American Television
    • FILM 389: Special Topics in Media
    • FILM 392: Film Genres
    • FILM 393: Documentary Film
    • FILM 395: National Cinemas: Western
    • FILM 396: National Cinemas: Non-Western
    • FILM 401: Film Criticism
    • FILM 404: Women in Film and Media
    • FILM 405: Experimental/Avant-Garde Cinema
    • GER 340: German Film
    • IDS 201: The Graphic Novel
    • IDS 385: Imaging Bodies, Screening Lives
    • JPN 375/FILM 396: National Cinemas: Japanese Film
    • JPN 378WR/ASIA 378WR: Postwar Japan through its Media
  5. One elective. One additional course from either section II, III, or IV above, or one of the following in media making:
    • ARTVIS 106: Photography I
    • ARTVIS 206R: Photography II
    • ARTVIS 306: Photography III
    • ARTVIS 385/FILM 385: Documentary Filmmaking
    • JRNL 201WR: News Reporting and Writing
    • JRNL 301: Adv New Reporting and Writing
    • JRNL 311: Electronic MEdia
    • JRNL 340: Arts Writing and Criticism (also THEA 340; DANC 340)
    • JRNL 380WR: Health and Science Writing
    • JRNL 450: News Video
    • POLS 386/FILM 389: Guerilla Political Videography

* Students may petition for approval of unlisted special topics or independent study courses with content focusing on media.

About the Minor in Media Studies

Emory College's interdisciplinary minor in Media Studies provides students with a critical understanding of the many modes of media that shape their experience of the world. Drawing on intellectual resources from many quarters of the Emory community, the minor in Media Studies will integrate theory and practice of media, combining historical and critical perspectives on a variety of media forms with opportunities for hands-on creative and analytical work in media making. In a word, the minor's goal is critical fluency in today's global mediascape.

The minor focuses on how media shape society and how they can be used for broad societal impact; it cultivates a perspective of engaged citizenship by teaching students how to navigate, filter, and evaluate mediated information and imagery; it is constitutively concerned with creativity, art and innovation in relation to a range of disciplinary inquiries; its reach is local and international in equal measures; and as a cross-disciplinary undertaking, it is the very definition of strategic collaboration across the campus in pursuit of new knowledge.

The minor in Media Studies equips undergraduates with the tools and perspectives they need to become media literate, media savvy and media fluent is one of the vital roles of liberal education in the 21st century.

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