Embodied: Human Health on Film

Due to Emory’s decision to close the campus for the rest of the Spring 2020 semester, all film series events are cancelled for the remainder of the semester. 

Press Contact: Gary Fessenden, gfessen@emory.edu

Program Contact: Rob Barracano, rbarrac@emory.edu

Emory explores film’s portrayal of Human Health in Free Screening Series
ATLANTA (January 2, 2020)—The Emory Department of Film and Media Studies is hosting a series of five free film screenings, “ EMBODIED: HUMAN HEALTH ON FILM” as part of Emory’s campus-wide celebration of Human Health and the Arts.

Beginning February 6 with The King’s Speech, the screenings will be held on Thursdays (or for Alive Inside Tuesday) at 7:30 PM through March 26 th in Emory University’s White Hall. They are free and open to the public. Most screenings will be shown in the theatrical projection formats 35mm or DCP.

Each film will be introduced by an expert in its area of focus and hosted by Prof. Rob Barracano or Dr. Matthew H. Bernstein (for Human Nature ) or Dr. Chris Eagle (for Alive Inside .) For more information, visit the Emory Film and Media Studies website at http://filmstudies.emory.edu/home/events/film-series/ or call 404-727-6761.

 

Thursday, February 6, 2020: The King’s Speech (2010) 119 minutes, 7:30 pm, White Hall, 208. DCP. Introduced by Dr. Chris Eagle (Human Health) and January Lavoy (Theater Studies)

“The story of King George VI, his impromptu ascension to the throne of the British Empire
in 1936, and the speech therapist who helped the unsure monarch overcome his stammer.”

This Academy Award-winning film has remarkable performances from Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush, struggling to find a way to provide a voice for a very uncertain king, a voice required to calm an entire country at the start of war.

Host Dr. Chris Eagle is a Senior Lecturer in the Center for the Study of Human Health at Emory. He is the author of Dysfluencies: On Speech Disorders in Modern Literature (Bloomsbury, 2013) and the editor of Talking Normal: Literature, Speech Disorders, and Disability. He has also published articles on Joyce, Proust, Heidegger, and Milton, among others.

Host Prof. LaVoy is a faculty member specializing in acting in the Department of Theater and Dance at Emory University. She is best known for her role as Noelle Ortiz-Stubbs on the long-running ABC daytime drama ONE LIFE TO LIVE. She has appeared on and Off-Broadway and guest-starred on several prime time network series, including Elementary, Blue Bloods, and N0S4A2. She is a member of Actors' Equity Association and SAG-AFTRA.

Tuesday, February 18, 2020: Alive Inside (2014), 99 minutes. DCP. 7:30 pm White Hall, 101. With an introduction by Dr. Chris Eagle (Human Health)

“Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, fights against a broken healthcare system to demonstrate music's ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it.”

How does music affect our brains? Can it heal us? How is it related to memories of past times?

Host Dr. Chris Eagle is a Senior Lecturer in the Center for the Study of Human Health at Emory. He is the author of Dysfluencies: On Speech Disorders in Modern Literature (Bloomsbury, 2013) and the editor of Talking Normal: Literature, Speech Disorders, and Disability. He has also published articles on Joyce, Proust, Heidegger, and Milton, among others.

Thursday, March 5, 2020: And The Band Played On (1993), 141 minutes. DCP. 7:30 pm White Hall, 208. DCP. With an introduction by Dr. Cindy Powell, School of Medicine, caregiver and survivor

“The story of the discovery of the AIDS epidemic, and the political infighting of the scientific community hampering the early fight with it.”

How do we as a people respond to plagues and epidemics? Do we ostracize the victims or comfort them? How do we as people respond to the spread of death?

Host, Dr. Powell is notable for her long history of caring for victims of AIDS during the height of the original AIDS crisis in Atlanta. She trained at Emory University in Internal Medicine and then completed fellowships in pulmonary and critical care medicine. In 2014, Dr. Powell decided to return to academic medicine and the opportunity to assist Emory with the implementation of its ECMO program and with the care of its critically ill patients.

March 19, 2020: Human Nature (2019), 95 minutes. DCP. 7:30 pm, White Hall, 208. DCP. Introduced by Dr. Paul Wolpe (Emory Center for Ethics) hosted by Dr. Matthew Bernstein (Film and Media Studies.)

“The biggest tech revolution of the 21st Century isn't digital, it's biological. A breakthrough called CRISPR has given us unprecedented control over the basic building blocks of life. It opens the door to curing diseases, reshaping the biosphere, and designing our own children…”

Host Dr. Paul Root Wolpe, Ph.D. is the Raymond F. Schinazi Distinguished Research Chair in Jewish Bioethics, a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Biological Behavior, and Sociology, and the Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Dr. Wolpe moved to Emory University in the summer of 2008 from the University of Pennsylvania, where he was on the faculty for over 20 years in the Departments of Psychiatry, Sociology, and Medical Ethics, and faculty in its Center for Bioethics.

March 26, 2020: Super Size Me (2004), 100 minutes. DCP. 7:30 pm, White Hall, 208. DCP. Introduced by Dr. Dan Berardot (Human Health)

“While examining the influence of the fast-food industry, Morgan Spurlock personally explores the consequences on his health of a diet of solely McDonald's food for one month.”

One of the most amusing films on the body ever made; it poses a challenge: what will happen to the filmmaker’s body if he only eats supersize McDonalds for a month?

Host Dr. Dan Benardot received his Ph.D. from Cornell University, is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian/Nutritionist, and is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. He is also a recipient of a Doctor of Humane Letters (DHC-Doctoria Honoris Causa) from Marywood University for his accomplishments in the area of sports nutrition. He recently retired as Professor of Nutrition, and Professor of Kinesiology and Health at Georgia State University, where he served as Director of the Laboratory for Elite Athlete Performance. He is now Professor Emeritus at Georgia State University and Professor of Practice in the Center for the Study of Human Health at Emory University.